Monthly Archives: February 2015

Friday, March 6: Ia Iashvili on migration from Georgia and its effect on those left behind

Ia Iashvili
Associate Professor of Human Geography
Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia
and
Director, American Studies Center
Akaki Tsereteli State University, Kutaisi, Georgia

“Split Families and Family Members Left Behind:

Migration from Georgia”

Ia IashviliIa Iashvili has been teaching at the Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University in Georgia for the past seven years, and director of the American Studies Center at Akaki Tsereteli State University, Kutaisi, Georgia, where she has also taught for 20 years. Her Ph.D. is in human geography. She has published widely in the areas of demographics, migration, environmental management, and tourism, with articles in such publications as Humanities and Social Sciences Review, Academic Journal of Science, Journal of American Studies, and Caucasus Geographical, as well as chapters in Main Issues in Human Geography and Workbook of the First International Conference “Kolheti lowland water ecosystems—protection and efficient use”. She was the project director for creating gender studies centers at Georgian universities, supported by the Open Society’s Georgia Foundation, and a coauthor of Georgia’s CEDAW report in 2002.

at the Center for European and Mediterranean Studies
4:30 – 6 p.m.
New York University
285 Mercer Street, 7th floor
(between Waverly and Washington Place)

Friday, February 13: Brigid O’Keeffe on Romani Women on the Early Soviet Stage

Brigid O’Keeffe,
Department of History, Brooklyn College

“Pornography or Authenticity?
The Politics of Romani Women’s Performance on the Early Soviet Stage”

 

Brigid O’Keeffe teaches in the department of history at Brooklyn College specializing in Russian and Soviet history. She is the author of New Soviet Gypsies: Nationality, Performance, and Selfhood in the Early Soviet Union (2013) from University of Toronto Press, and is currently working on a book-length research project examining Esperanto, citizen diplomacy, and internationalism in Russia from 1887 to 1939. She has contributed articles to the International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice and Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History and a chapter in Russia’s People of Empire: Life Stories from Eurasia, 1500 to the Present. Fellowships she’s received include from IREX, Fulbright-Hays, and the Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation Fellowship for Outstanding Teaching. Her blog post at NYU’s Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia, discussed “How (Not) to Talk About Roma.” She’s co-organized panels for the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies on Slavic internationalism in the 1920s, why Roma history is important, Jewish and Romani narratives of their 20th century expriences, and “The Science of Everyday Life in the Soviet Union, as well as presented papers at the Association for the Study of Nationalities; Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies; inaugural conference in Romani Studies, and many other meetings. O’Keeffe is an executive board member of the Northeast Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies Conference.

at the Center for European and Mediterranean Studies
4:30 – 6 p.m.
New York University
285 Mercer Street, 7th floor
(between Waverly and Washington Place)