Friday, May 8: Ermira Danaj on women in post-1990 Albanian migration

Ermira Danaj,
Ph.D. candidate,
Center for the Understanding of Social Processes,
University of Neuchatel, Switzerland,
and women’s rights activist

“Exploring Practices and Strategies of Women
in the Post-1990 Albanian Migration”

Ermira Danaj , currently a Ph.D. candidate at the Center for the Understanding of Social Processes at the University of Neuchatel, writes on gender and migration in Albania. Since 2002 she has worked on projects concerning gender, poverty, and migration in Albania with international and national organizations. From 2009 to 2012 she was a lecturer on feminist theory at the European University of Tirana, Albania. She has participated widely in the Albanian print and TV media to promote women’s rights and denounce gender inequalities, and is the coauthor of reports and publications about gender issues in Albania. She was a Fulbright visiting scholar at the Transregional Center for Demoracy Studies and Department of Gender Studies at the New School, New York (February-May 2013), and a visiting researcher at the CIES, ISCTE-IUL (Centre for Research and Studies in Sociology at the University Institute of Lisbon), in Portugal (2013-2014).

4:30 – 6 p.m.
at the Center for European and Mediterranean Studies
New York University
285 Mercer Street, 7th floor
(between Waverly and Washington Place)
for more information, contact the center at 212-998-3838 or european.studies@nyu.edu

Friday, April 17: Louise O. Vasvari on Hungarian women’s Holocaust life writing

Louise O. Vasvari,
Professor Emeritus, Stony Brook University,
Comparative  Literature and of Linguistics;
Editor-in-chief, Hungarian Cultural Studies

“Hungarian Women’s Holocaust Life Writing in the Context
of the Nation’s Divided Social Memory, 1944-2014″

vasvari picture 2015.msgLouise O. Vasvári received her Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley. She is professor emerita of comparative literature and of linguistics at Stony Brook University.  She has also taught at the University of California, Berkeley; Eötvös Loránd University; the Central European University in Budapest; the University of Connecticut (Storrs); and the Université de Jules Verne (Amiens). Currently she teaches one course yearly in the linguistics department at NYU. She is also affiliated professor in American and English studies at the University of Szeged, Hungary. She works in medieval studies, historical and sociolinguistics, translation theory, Holocaust studies, and Hungarian studies, all informed by gender theory within a broader framework of comparative cultural studies. Related to the Holocaust, she has published, with Steven Tötösy, Imre Kertész and Holocaust Literature (2005), Comparative Central European Holocaust Studies (2009), and Comparative Hungarian Cultural Studies (2011). She has also published in Hungarian on memoirs of Hungarian women survivors (2009) and on women prisoner doctors (2012). She is editor-in-chief of Hungarian Cultural Studies and currently she is working on a volume titled War and Life Writing (Purdue University Press, 2015).

4:30 – 6 p.m.
at the Center for European and Mediterranean Studies

New York University
285 Mercer Street, 7th floor
(between Waverly and Washington Place)
for more information, contact the center at 212-998-3838 or european.studies@nyu.edu

Friday, March 6: Ia Iashvili on migration from Georgia and its effect on those left behind

Ia Iashvili
Associate Professor of Human Geography
Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia
and
Director, American Studies Center
Akaki Tsereteli State University, Kutaisi, Georgia

“Split Families and Family Members Left Behind:

Migration from Georgia”

Ia IashviliIa Iashvili has been teaching at the Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University in Georgia for the past seven years, and director of the American Studies Center at Akaki Tsereteli State University, Kutaisi, Georgia, where she has also taught for 20 years. Her Ph.D. is in human geography. She has published widely in the areas of demographics, migration, environmental management, and tourism, with articles in such publications as Humanities and Social Sciences Review, Academic Journal of Science, Journal of American Studies, and Caucasus Geographical, as well as chapters in Main Issues in Human Geography and Workbook of the First International Conference “Kolheti lowland water ecosystems—protection and efficient use”. She was the project director for creating gender studies centers at Georgian universities, supported by the Open Society’s Georgia Foundation, and a coauthor of Georgia’s CEDAW report in 2002.

at the Center for European and Mediterranean Studies
4:30 – 6 p.m.
New York University
285 Mercer Street, 7th floor
(between Waverly and Washington Place)

Friday, February 13: Brigid O’Keeffe on Romani Women on the Early Soviet Stage

Brigid O’Keeffe,
Department of History, Brooklyn College

“Pornography or Authenticity?
The Politics of Romani Women’s Performance on the Early Soviet Stage”

 

Brigid O’Keeffe teaches in the department of history at Brooklyn College specializing in Russian and Soviet history. She is the author of New Soviet Gypsies: Nationality, Performance, and Selfhood in the Early Soviet Union (2013) from University of Toronto Press, and is currently working on a book-length research project examining Esperanto, citizen diplomacy, and internationalism in Russia from 1887 to 1939. She has contributed articles to the International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice and Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History and a chapter in Russia’s People of Empire: Life Stories from Eurasia, 1500 to the Present. Fellowships she’s received include from IREX, Fulbright-Hays, and the Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation Fellowship for Outstanding Teaching. Her blog post at NYU’s Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia, discussed “How (Not) to Talk About Roma.” She’s co-organized panels for the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies on Slavic internationalism in the 1920s, why Roma history is important, Jewish and Romani narratives of their 20th century expriences, and “The Science of Everyday Life in the Soviet Union, as well as presented papers at the Association for the Study of Nationalities; Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies; inaugural conference in Romani Studies, and many other meetings. O’Keeffe is an executive board member of the Northeast Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies Conference.

at the Center for European and Mediterranean Studies
4:30 – 6 p.m.
New York University
285 Mercer Street, 7th floor
(between Waverly and Washington Place)

Friday, January 30: Aslihan Aykac on Gender Inequality in Turkey

Aslihan Aykac,
Department of International Relations, Ege University, Izmir, Turkey, and Visiting Scholar, School of Management and Labor Relations, Rutgers University

“Ideological Roots of Gender Inequality in Turkey”

Aslihan Aykac is a Turkish sociologist, whose work focuses mainly on contemporary work and labor relations. She works at the Department of International Relations at Ege University in Izmir, Turkey, and is currently a Fulbright Visiting Scholar at Rutgers University, School of Management and Labor Relations. Her interest on gender issues is mainly from a labor perspective, focusing on women’s labor force particiation and the way political approaches affect women’s work experiences. Her previous work on “The Impact of Social Security Reform on Women’s Labor Force Participation in Turkey” was supported by the Middle East Research Competition, which will be part of a book project on gender politics in Turkey.

 

 

at the Center for European and Mediterranean Studies
4:30 – 6 p.m.
New York University
285 Mercer Street, 7th floor
(between Waverly and Washington Place)

Spring 2015 Schedule

New York University
Center for European and Mediterranean Studies
and the Network of East-West Women

present

Gender and Transformation: Women in Europe

Spring 2015 Workshop Schedule

January 30

Aslihan Aykac, Department of International Relations, Ege University, Izmir, Turkey, and Visiting Scholar, School of Management and Labor Relations,
Rutgers University

“Ideological Roots of Gender Inequality in Turkey”

February 13

Brigid M. O’Keeffe, Assistant Professor of History, Brooklyn College

“Pornography or Authenticity?
The Politics of Romani Women’s Performance on the Early Soviet Stage”

March 6

Ia Iashvili, Associate Professor of Human Geography and director of the American Studies Center, Akaki Tsereteli State University, Kutaisi, Georgia

“Split Families and Family Members Left Behind: Migration from Georgia”

April 17

Louise O. Vasvári, Professor Emeritus, Stony Brook University, Comparative  Literature and of Linguistics; Editor-in-Chief of Hungarian Cultural Studies

Hungarian Women’s Holocaust Life Writing
in the Context of Hungary’s Divided Social Memory, 1944-2014”

May 8

Ermira Danaj, Ph.D. candidate, Center for the Understanding of Social Processes,
University of Neuchatel;  women’s rights activist

“Exploring Practices and Strategies of Women in the Post-1990 Albanian Migration”

Friday, December 5: Hushnuda Shukurova, Women in Tajikistan

Hushnuda Shukurova, Activist and Filmmaker 

Exploring the Complex Life of Rural Women in Tajikistan through Film

Our last presentation for the fall semester features the work of Hushnuda Shukurova, a Tajik feminist, activist, and film maker.  She will speak about her documentary, “Live Life Regardless,” which traces the life of a Tajik widow, mother of eight, wshukurovaho provides for many in her village. See trailer here: http://vimeo.com/khushnuda.

The workshop meets from 4:30 to 6:00 pm at the Center for European and Mediterranean Studies, New York University, 285 Mercer Street (between Washington and Waverly)

Friday, November 7: Elżbieta Klimek-Dominiak, University of Wrocław and Jill Massino, University of North Carolina, Charlotte

Friday, November 7 we are excited to bring two speakers:

Elżbieta Klimek-Dominiak, Ph.D., Assistant Professor and Head of Gender Studies, University of Wrocław

“From Solidarity to Backlash: Engendering Polish Revolution and Transformation in Women’s Life Writing”

Prof. Klimek-Dominiak is Assistant Professor and Head of Gender Studies at the University of Wrocław. Her publications include : “Disintegration of a Jewish Polish Identity and Re-Invention of a Postmodern Hybridized Self in Eva Hoffman’s Lost in Translation: Life in a New Language.” Belgrade English Language and Literature Studies 3 (2011) and ”Fictions of Western Hypermasculinity and Freedom: A. Proulx’s Close Range: Brokeback Mountain and Other Stories.” Anglica Wratislaviensia 47 (2009).

Her presentation interrogates the gendering of the Polish non-violent (r)evolution of ’ June 89, the current backlash against Polish democratization process in the form of  cultural war on “gender ideology” and considers how the process of reclaiming women’s representation of the Polish underground movement of the 1970s, 1980s and transformation has become a revolutionary force uniting the liberal feminist mass social movement of Kongres Kobiet (appr.10 thousand women in the Congress of Women with its regional chapters), the more academic feminist wing of the New Left of Krytyka Polityczna [Political Critique] and street movement associated with March 8, Manifa and One Billion Rising groups.

and

Jill Massino, Ph.D., Department of History, University of North Carolina, Charlotte. 

“We Want Rights, not Charity:” Gender and the Meanings of Citizenship in Post-Socialist Romania”

Jill Massino is an Assistant Professor of European history at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte where she teaches courses on modern Europe, Communist and Post-Communist Eastern Europe, history and memory, and gender and war. Her publications include: Gender Politics and Everyday Life in State Socialist Eastern and Central Europe, coedited with Shana Penn (2009); “From Black Caviar to Blackouts: Gender, Consumption, and Lifestyle in Ceauşescu’s Romania,” in Communism Unwrapped: Consumption in Cold War Eastern Europe, ed. Paulina Bren and Mary Neuburger (2012); and “Something Old, Something New: Marital Roles and Relations in State Socialist Romania,” Journal of Women’s History (2010). She is currently completing a book manuscript, “Ambiguous Transitions: Gender, the State, and Everyday Life in Postwar Romania,” which blends archival, legislative, and media resources with oral history interviews to examine the lived experiences of women and men in socialist and post-socialist Romania. Her new project will explore Romania’s relationship with various countries in the Global South during the Cold War.

Friday October 10: Alexandr Berezkin, “Russian Intersexuality: Resistance and Conformity”

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Our second meeting of the fall semester features Alexandr Berezkin, Russian sociologiest and LGBT and Intersex activist. He will speak on “Russian Intersexuality: Resistance and Conformity.”

Berezkin is a graduate of Kemerovo State University in sociology and has worked for over six years as a sociologist. His LGBTI-activism began in 2011, and in 2012 Berezkin became head of the regional branch of Russian LGBT Network in Vladivostok. He was the initiator and creator of a support and information group for intersex people “Association Russian-Speaking Intersex” in 2013. He has participated as a co-executor in the “Monitoring and assistance to victims of crimes motivated by homophobia and transphobia in Russia in 2011-2012”, which was organized by Russian LGBT Network and the German Foundation “Remembrance. Responsibility. Future”. He took part in the program “International Visitors Leadership Program on LGBT Human rights in Russia” in November 2013.

He is the author of over fifteen articles and worked at Far Eastern Federal University in Vladivostok from 2010-2014. He was forced to resign in 2014, however, because of his activism and is now seeking political asylum and living in New York City.

Fri Sept 12, 4:30 pm: Prof. Ulrike Auga, “Resistance, Gender, Religion and the Radical Social Imaginary: A Genealogy from Eastern European Dissidence to New Social Movements”

 auga2014Please join us Friday, September 12 at 4:30 pm for the first talk of the Fall 2014 series: Ulrike Auga,  Ph.D. Associate Professor, Theology and Gender Studies, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany, and Dietrich-Bonhoeffer-Visiting-Professor and Research Fellow, Union Theological Seminary, New York: “Resistance, Gender, Religion and the Radical Social Imaginary: A Genealogy from Eastern European Dissidence to New Social Movements” 

Ulrike Auga was born in East-Berlin and participated in the struggle of the peaceful revolution 1989. In that light she was educated as a Protestant theologian and was later trained as a cultural theory and gender scholar in Berlin, Geneva and at Cambridge (UK). After that she lived and worked for many years in South Africa, Mali, Palestine, and Israel.

Her interests are at the crossing points of an epistemological critique of religion and revised political and liberation theologies with cultural, gender, queer, postcolonial and post-secular theory, e.g.: religion, biopower/biopolitics, (epistemic) violence, resistance, agency and human flourishing, social imaginary and materiality in counter discourses to the neoliberal Empire, political contemporary transition contexts, new social movements; postcolonial critique of the intellectual; visual culture, resistance and agency.

All workshop sessions take place at the NYU Center for European and Mediterranean Studies, 285 Mercer St., 7th Floor. (Between Waverly and Washington Place)

 

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